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Banned!

April 21, 2011

The Niqab (Face-veil) ban Law, that was passed out in France a few days ago, is a topic i have been trying to mentally avoid with no luck, so here goes.
In a country (Lebanon) fighting for it’s own secular state, the definition of Secularism is still fresh and ready: separation of state from religion. Which entitles equality of everyone based on the simple fact that everyone is human (full-stop).
A country that claims Secularism (France) has been scuffling with Islamic dress-code for a while now, first with the headscarf, that eventually was banned in all schooling premises (even for parents picking up their children) and now with the face-veil/Niqab ban. Even further, the arguments in favor of the law are everything But secular…

- Image © bagnewsnotes.com

1. Muslim states enforce a clothing law on it’s residents regardless of their religion, so muslims have no right to complain when the same happens to them in non-Muslim countries…
…. 1. these countries are … too few to earn the reputation of the majority, and in most cases, it’s is socially unacceptable to dress in a revealing manner, but not punishable by law.
2. these “countries” don’t pretend to be democratic or secular
3. these “countries” shouldn’t be encouraged to continue in this manner and should be pushed to address the issue of freedom of religion and cloth

2. The Niqab is not a forced Islamic dress and therefore should not create outrage in the Muslim community…
…. Secular French Government meddling with religion’s premises? I do believe it not for any government to decide what is and what is not acceptable and required of a religious practice. And that when such meddling does occur, it should be condemned.

3. The countries security is at stake…
…. How many women wear Niqab in France? In Europe? In the West? How much of threat are they to society?
Incidents have occurred where people used niqab to hide their identity in illegal activities, but people have done that under many other covers and without covers as well.

… these are too name a few of the highlights, but the list of un-reasoning can go on till tomorrow

Niqab vs bikini in Lebanon

"Niqab vs bikini in Lebanon" Image from Spanish Pundit/ toastedbread.wordpress.com

Beyond symbolizing the precepts of religion in this unique post 9-11 era, veils also graphically articulate the widening chasm between West and East.” … so instead of educating people on human rights, tolerance and acceptance, we just make everyone fit one mold and accept discrimination based on garment?

Banning a facial garment is equivalent to banning males from growing their hair into pony tails…
I would love to see how this Law will fly in a Human Rights conference..

Instead of liberating women from their veils, maybe we should focus on liberating minds from in-tolerance.

Press Round-Up:
Wearing the burqa in our streets is a hostile act: the French are right to ban it – Catholic Herald
France’s burqa ban: A brave step that we Muslims should welcome – The Christian Science Monitor
French niqab ban-2 – Arab News
Full-face veils outlawed as France spells out controversial niqab ban – The Guardian
How a Niqab Ban Lifts the Veil on Problems East and West – MidEast Posts
Europe goes communal – Daily Times
France’s Niqab Ban: Tricolor Face of the New Feminism – BagNewsNotes.com

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5 Comments leave one →
  1. April 21, 2011 4:24 am

    I totally get what you’re saying here!
    “Instead of liberating women from their veils, maybe we should focus on liberating minds from in-tolerance”
    That’s the very obvious issue here (and not just in France, everywhere!)
    Creating this kind of buzz on such a negative approach to this somewhat “delicate” subject is absurd!

    “muslims have no right to complain when the same happens to them in non-Muslim countries…” That’s the hypocrisy part…

  2. April 21, 2011 8:28 am

    This is a complicated issue. European countries are struggling with cultural identity, and that’s making them pass some strange laws left and right. I’m not exactly sure where to stand on this, it’s nice to aspire to ideal concepts, but in the end of it all, these countries are dealing with some serious integration and cultural identity problems.

    The laws might be blowing things out of proportion (I would definitely say so), but education and the liberation of minds is not something you can sell to a politician. It tends to become more unrealistic once you look at the state of the public education system in the country, particularly in the poorer districts.

    As I said, I really don’t know where to stand on this one, it’s.. complicated.
    I tried to put the whole thing into words about a year ago when Belgium passed a similar law, you can find it all here:
    http://www.lifewithsubtitles.com/2010/05/exotic-gift-understanding-burka-issue.html

    Cheers !

    • April 21, 2011 9:23 am

      “I’m not exactly sure where to stand on this, it’s nice to aspire to ideal concepts, but in the end of it all, these countries are dealing with some serious integration and cultural identity problems.”

      Well… for some other countries, their “cultural identity” dictate stoning women, forbidding freedom of speech and dealing aggressively with homosexuality.

      Where do you stand? Because such countries are also “dealing with some serious integration and cultural identity problems.” So lets unify the judgement standards and go forward from there.

      • April 21, 2011 10:03 am

        You’re right.
        There was a time when all across Europe witches were being burned. At that time, they probably also had the moral high ground.

        Now look at France from a point of view where they’re Not supposed to represent a better model of living. They see a manifestation, albeit a benign choice of clothing, that they don’t quite appreciate, and would like to do away with it.

        The passing of the law is retarded, and in all probability, no good will come of it. The attempt behind it however (the prevention of the proliferation of the niqab), is understandable. They don’t want that stuff “in their backyard”, they see it as an unfortunate result of their immigration policy, and believe that they should act against it now, better than later.

  3. yorikirii permalink
    April 22, 2011 6:29 pm

    Totally agree with your points. As always, we are going after the women, attacking the weak link of it all. Growing long beards on the other hand is still allowed in France… My statement regarding this issue: Banning the Niqab, Banning Ourselves – http://yorikirii.blogspot.com/

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